Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Venus/Olympia images


         Édouard Manet, Le Déjeuner Sur l’herbe,(18-15)
         Édouard Manet, Olympia (18-16)
         Édouard Manet, Bar at the Folies-Bergère, (18-21)
         Yasumasa Morimura, Daughters of Art History, not in book Renee Cox, Cousins at Pussy Pond, not in book





Giorgione, Sleeping Venus , 1510, Venetian Renaissance




"...a courtesan by Titian..." Titian's Venus of Urbino, 1538, Venetian Renaissance
Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, La Grande Odalisque, 1814

Odalisque - Eugene Delacroix
Delacroix, Odalisque, 1825

Alexander Cabanal, Birth of Venus, 1863, Salon painting, french academic paintingThe stuff that lead to Cabanal (the old masters)

the stuff Baudelaire wants: the sort of object Baudelaire calls for... 




Edouard Manet, Olympia, 1863, French Modernism, Realism*

Images from Constantine Guy

Courbet, The Studio of the Painter: a real Allegory, 1855 (880)*


on the left, the 'real life' that courbet paints, while turning his back on the model available to pose as venus as Salon painters would have done. On the left, the artists friends, including Baudelaire himself, and novelist Georges Sand, art critic and realist novelist Champfleury, and anarchist Proudhon.

In the Street - Constantin Guys

who is our painter of modern life? 


Eduard Manet, Olympia, 1863, oil on canvas
“Manet’s Olympia,” by Margaret Atwood, originally published in Winter 93-94 Ploughshares
She reclines, more or less.
Try that posture, it’s hardly languor.
Her right arm sharp angles.
With her left she conceals her ambush.
Shoes but not stockings,
how sinister. The flower
behind her ear is naturally
not real, of a piece
with the sofa’s drapery.
The windows (if any) are shut.
This is indoor sin.
Above the head of the (clothed) maid
is an invisible voice balloon: Slut.
But. Consider the body,
unfragile, defiant, the pale nipples
staring you right in the bull’s-eye.
Consider also the black ribbon
around the neck. What’s under it?
A fine red threadline, where the head
was taken off and glued back on.
The body’s on offer,
but the neck’s as far as it goes.
This is no morsel.
Put clothes on her and you’d have a schoolteacher,
the kind with the brittle whiphand.
There’s someone else in this room.
You, Monsieur Voyeur.
As for that object of yours
she’s seen those before, and better.

I, the head, am the only subject
of this picture.
You, Sir, are furniture.
Get stuffed.
Extremely useful article about Olympia from Salon.com
Victorine Louise Meurent (1844 – 1927).jpg
Only surviving painting by Victorine Meurent, from 1880's, and portrait of Victorine MEurent from her Carte de Visite.

Manet, The Street Singer, 1862






Yasumasa Morimura
Olympia,
1990
Chromogenic print on canvas, ed. 2/3


Edouard Manet, Bar at the Folies Bergere, 1882,
Yasumasa Morimura, Daughter of Art History (theater B), 1990
Yasumasa Morimura, Daughter of Art History (theater A), 1990

Yasumasa Morimura, Mona Lisa in Pregnancy, 1998
Chromogenic print on canvas, ed. 2/3

http://designblog.uniandes.edu.co/blogs/dise1314/files/2009/02/morimura1.jpg
Yasumasa Morimura, Daughter of Art History (Princess A), 1990
Eduard Manet, Dejeuner sur l'Herbe (Luncheon on the Grass), 1863,

Painting vs.??? Photography

File:Nadar-Self-Portrait.jpg
Nadar, Self-Portrait, about 1856


French photographer Gaspard-Félix Tournachon, known as Nadar, would celebrate his birthday this week, April 6th (1820) if he had not died 99 years ago last week (March 21, 1910). The date just provides a happy coincidence for the staging of this week's play. A play set in Paris, about 1860, when photography brings to light many provocative questions about representation and art. (The word photography means light-writing.)

I haven't yet written that play. The characters interest me in part because of their connections to each other via work, love, family, rivalry, inspiration and play. You can see a few places the characters overlap in the 'photo-essay' below.

The Players, all as photographed by Nadar.


Nadar, Berthe Morisot, 1870


Nadar, Charles Baudelaire, ~1856

http://www.aloj.us.es/galba/monograficos/LOFOTOGRAFICO/PREIMPRESIONISTAS/FOTOGRAFOS/Nadar/Nadar_Manet1865-3.jpg
Nadar, Edouard Manet, 1865

http://www.aloj.us.es/galba/monograficos/LOFOTOGRAFICO/PREIMPRESIONISTAS/FOTOGRAFOS/Nadar/Nadar_AutoGlobo1.jpg
Nadar in The Giant, the balloon he flew over Paris to photograph the city from above, "taking photography higher than any other art"
 
Félix but Paul Nadar, his son, released the shutter on this photo of Monet:

Paul Nadar, Claud Monet, 1899

And, for good measure, a painting of one of our players by another. Berthe Morisot is the grand-niece of the painter Fragonard and the sister-in-law of Edouard Manet.
Berthe Morisot with a bouquet of violets - Edouard Manet
Édouard Manet, Berthe Morisot with a Bouquet of Violets, 1872

File:Manet - Berthe Morisot ruhend.jpg
Édouard Manet, Berthe Morisot , 1872

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/80/Berthe_Morisot_Manet_Lille_2918.jpg
Édouard Manet, Berthe Morisot , 1874

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1419/1320119605_ff5b3063b3.jpg
Édouard Manet, Berthe Morisot with a Fan, 1872


Edgar Dégas, Manet listening to his wife play Piano, 1870's


Edgar Dégas, Mary Cassatt Playing Cards, 1884

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Edgar Dégas, Au Musee du Louvre (Miss Cassatt), 1879

The image “http://quotationsbook.com/assets/shared/img/533/Charles_Baudelaire_by_Manet.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
Manet, caricature of Baudelaire,



The image “http://www.fineartprintsondemand.com/artists/manet/monet_in_his_floating_studio-400.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
Manet, Monet in his Floating Studio, ~1874


Manet, Déjeuner sure l'Herbe (Luncheon on the Grass), 1863

Monet, Déjeuner sure l'Herbe (Luncheon on the Grass), 1865

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Neoclassicism, Salon Painting, Romanticism, Realism


Rococo
(a style that originated in France in the 18th century marked by elaborate decorativeness, light colors, and organic forms. In painting, Rococo subjects tend toward the frivolous, elegant, flirtation, and typically deploy symbolic iconography that audiences could read as readily as a text.)
Jean-Honoré Fragonard, The Happy Accidents of the Swing, 1767, French Rococo*
Neoclassicism
(in painting, a return to classical emphasis on sobriety and restraint in form and content-- precise lines, clarity, order, unity and often symmetry. Usually joined by a return to classical subject matter.)
David, Napoleon Crossing the Alps, 1802*
Salon Painting (also known as French Academic Painting)
File:William-Adolphe Bouguereau (1825-1905) - The Birth of Venus (1879).jpg
Bouguereau, Birth of Venus, 1879
Romanticism:
Reached back away from classicism toward a more medieval (or Baroque) emphasis on emotion, including terror, awe, joy, loneliness. Romantics expressed their love for nature in serene landscapes where humans played small roles. While neoclassicism erased the presence of the artist in smooth canvases with tiny brush marks, the romantics celebrated the artists unique imagination, and you can see that in their active, animated brushwork.
The image “http://hoocher.com/Caspar_David_Friedrich/Monk_by_the_Sea_1809.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
Caspar David Friedrich, Monk by the Shore, 1809* (854)(what emotional aspect of Modernism does this image illustrate poignantly?) ,

The image “http://www.mtholyoke.edu/~nigro20e/classweb/thirdofmaycopy1.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
Goya, Third of May 1808, 1814 (857)*
http://www.lib-art.com/imgpainting/9/2/10429-the-raft-of-the-medusa-theodore-gericault.jpgTheodore Géricault, Raft of the Medusa, 1819(860),
Realism:
as opposed to Romanticism and neoclassicism, Realism seeks to show life experiences as they are, without exaggerations or idealizations. Realist painters often chose 'low' subjects, and did not sought to show viewers that they were looking at paintings, rather than to deceive them into believing in the illusion.
Jean-Francois Millet, The Gleaners, 1857(882)
Manet, Lunch in the Studio, 1879(888
If a painstaking scrupulous, but feebly imaginative artist has to paint a courtesan of today and takes his ‘inspiration’ (that is the accepted word) from a courtesan by Titian or Raphael, it is only too likely that he will produce a work which is false, ambiguous and obscure. From the study of a masterpiece of that time and type he will learn nothing of the bearing, the glance, the smile or the living ‘style’ of one of those creatures whom the dictionary of fashion has successively classified under the coarse or playful titles of ‘doxies’, ‘kept women’, lorettes, or biches.
in other words. The stuff Baudelaire hates:
Alexander Cabanal, Birth of Venus, 1863, Salon painting, french academic painting
The stuff that lead to Cabanal (the old masters):

"...a courtesan by Titian..." Titian's Venus of Urbino, 1538, Venetian Renaissance
the stuff Baudelaire wants:

the sort of object Baudelaire calls for... Edouard Manet, Olympia, 1863, French Modernism, Realism*



Images from Constantine Guy

Courbet, The Studio of the Painter: a real Allegory, 1855 (880)*
on the left, the 'real life' that courbet paints, while turning his back on the model available to pose as venus as Salon painters would have done. On the left, the artists friends, including Baudelaire himself, and novelist Georges Sand, art critic and realist novelist Champfleury, and anarchist Proudhon.